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Every machine designer wants to deliver the best possible performance. Especially in today’s food and beverage industry, the pressure for optimum throughput and quality means that every OEM is striving to engineer new systems that are the best of the best.

At Kollmorgen, there are more and more female employees every year, which really helps to broaden overall perspectives. Everyone agrees that diversity drives innovation and these values apply to the group at every level.

We are now living in a digital world. E-commerce consumers expect goods to be delivered faster and more flexibly than was the case just a couple of years ago. Organizations, retailers, and their warehouse service providers therefore need to find new ways to move, store, and dispatch goods with agility and accuracy. Add the widespread shortage of labor and you have an indisputable case for automated solutions to meet the myriad of challenges.

When learning about servo motors and servo systems, you’re likely to encounter the phrase “closed-loop system.” If you’ve ever wondered what that means and how it works, you’ve come to the right place. Let’s step through some of the most common questions.

Robotic joint design almost always involves tradeoffs. But does it have to be that way? Let’s look at the three most common compromises.

If you’re looking for precise motion with easy setup, then stepper motors should be your first choice when building or upgrading a machine.

In the automation world there can be a fine line between what is considered a motion controller and what represents a basic servo drive. It is critical to understand the functionality and intelligence of each device since, in many applications, both a motion controller and a servo drive are required to complete the system.

To get the most out of your stepper motor, you need to pair it with the proper drive. There are three critical elements to keep in mind when making your selection: voltage, current and inductance. Each one plays an important part in a motor’s performance, and not accounting for these parameters can lead to poor performance or even cause the motor to overheat and fail—resulting in lost production time and increased maintenance costs. 

Missiles operate in some of the most demanding conditions. They can experience massive heat flux when going through the layers of the earth’s atmosphere and because of the sheer speed that the missile is traveling at. With speeds in excess of 10,000 kilometers per hour, they require components that can provide reliability and precise motion under these conditions. And with the need to respond to higher demands for performance, the technology powering these missiles needs to deliver more torque and power in relation to weight.

For rapidly evolving Aerospace and Defense (A&D) requirements, engineers are facing many challenges to keep up with ever evolving demands. From supply chain issues to changing government regulations, companies are being tasked with not only navigating these global issues but also providing more value-based technologies, reliable products, and constant innovation.  

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