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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

Question: I need to operate a servo motor in a vacuum, what are some considerations? 

Answer: In a word?  Outgassing.  You might think that proper motor sizing is a big issue, it always is, however if you can't conform to the other process requirements, there is no point to attempting to size the motor.  The biggest issue for any given motor selection to be run in a given vacuum for a specific process is the outgassing requirement, or rather, the avoidance of materials that would affect the process being performed and/or the life of the motor.

I was going over some inventory the other day, and I ran across our old blog of 101 ways to brake your motor -episode 82.  The author of that piece, Mike, was just having fun with the title and the number 82. But it dawned on me, that we might be due for another installment.

Let me preface by saying that I am not an engineer. I do however read, on average, about 20 old and new industry articles a week, as well as the content that I share in training and on our social media pages.  I have discovered several ways to break motors throughout the years.  Some of them have some really great stories and I'll try to get their witnesses to write them down for future blog posts.  I have, however, discovered one of the most boring ways to break a motor.  And I guess I really discovered it as a child.

In the mid-1970s, Tetra Pak started to use AGVs (automated guided vehicles) in their manufacturing and warehouse facilities.

Want to join the industry 4.0 revolution but don’t know where to start? Here is how AGVs can make a real difference at a modest investment.

Most of the AKD drive’s parameters have a 32bit data size, but some parameters have a 64bit data size.  Modbus communication on the AKD drive uses registers of a 16bit data size.  So for a 64bit parameter, it takes four registers to send the data over Modbus.  There are many devices, including PLC’s, HMI’s, and PC programs that do not handle a 64bit data size.  So what can be done to read and write 64bit values when working with Modbus and a device that only supports 32bit values?
Over the years there have been discussions about the 1.8 degree step angle versus 0.9 degree step angle of industrial hybrid stepper motors.  Most stepper motors today have the standard step angle of 1.8 degrees, resulting in a 200 step per revolution.   However, in the early days of stepper motors, before microstepping, low end resonance played a significant role in many applications.  Most application engineers suggested either increasing the load, to lower the bandwidth frequency, or simply avoiding this low end resonance region altogether.
As it turns out, "going small" is an effort that traces back to the first steppers ever manufactured. Released in 1952, the Sigma "Cyclonome 9" series, one of the first steppers ever designed, was the first standard offering of its kind. Motors had a frame size of 1 3/16 inches, roughly the size of a modern day NEMA 11 motor. With a torque range of 1 - 12 oz-in, common applications at the time included printers, tape readers, and chart drive and display controls. Just like today, the small form factor of these motors allowed OEMs to reduce the overall size and footprint of their machines.

I often see some confusion in various customers’ minds regarding encoder performance with automation systems which have servo drives or variable frequency drives (VFD). Some customers feel that when they are providing best in class encoders, the system must be highly accurate.

Sounds logical? … Yes, but there are some other points to consider also.

Brushless AC servo motors  and  stepper motors  have long life spans, which are largely due to the lack of wearing components.  Unlike brush type motors, other than the bearings, brushless AC servo motors and stepper motors have no wearing components.  Additionally you do not have conductive brush dust, which, as it collects on the commutator, may short the armature. 

Never sized a servo before? Well, we want to share with you some of the best practices we have found over the years. Over the next few months, we will continue this series with a variety of tidbits that will help you become more comfortable with the job of sizing a servo. In this post, we’ll start with the basics of good preparation.

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