Back to top

AKDs and their differences

0 votes
+ vote
Vote up!

What are the basic differences between the AKD-B, AKD-C, AKD-N, AKD-T, AKD-P? For somebody fairly new to the industry like me, I would be nice to be able to explain the features, advantages, disadvantages to customers. The Kollmorgen website talks about its great features, but does not tell me what applications are appropriate for each drive. Not only will the drive be appropriately selected, but also will save the customer hundreds of dollars. If I can also get application examples that would be very helpful as well.

0 Comments

2 Answers

0 votes
+ vote
Vote up!

 Here is a brief description of the AKD drive models and types of applications they might be use in.

AKD-B:

This is the "Base" drive.  Not to be confused with the "Basic" drive.  The base drive has all of the features of the "P" or indexing drive except for the Motion Tasking (or indexing).  Base drives can run in analog mode, electronic gearing (encoder following), step & direction.  It has digital inputs and outputs.  It supports both Telnet and Modbus TCP communications.  Generally, it is run with digital inputs configured for "Jog", or an analog command signal from a PLC, or an electronic gearing signal from a PLC or actual encoder.  This is the lowest cost model and is good for reducing cost when other AKD features are not needed.  However, I always recommend the "P" or "T" model in applications where the necessary functionality has not yet been proven out.

AKD-P:

​This drive has all of the features of the "B" model with the addition of Motion Tasking (indexing moves) and fieldbus communications.  This drive is used in applications needing position control in the drive or needing the drive to be commanded via communications from a master controller.

AKD-T:

​This is the "Basic" drive, meaning it contains a Basic program.  It is similar to the "B" model with the addition of Basic programming.  This drive is useful whenever logic programming is needed in the drive, whether or not it is used with a PLC.  It supports Modbus TCP with the capability of communicating with the Basic program.  This drive is commonly used when simple Motion Tasking doesn't provide enough flexibility.  It is also used for camming, and most other application that the "B" or "P" models can't handle.  This is a great drive for prototyping, because of the programming flexibility.  It is fairly easy to program, and we have numerous sample programs available.

AKD-C and AKD-N:

​This is the decentralized drive.  The AKD-C is the power supply and main communications master.  The AKD-N's are the amplifiers.  The purpose of this system is to have the amplifiers located very close to the motors to minimize cabling.  The AKD-C communicates with the AKD-N drives using EtherCAT.

PDMM or AKD-M:

This is part of the KAS offering.  The PDMM is an AKD drive with a built-in master controller.  It uses the KAS programming and can control up to 8 axes (PDMM + 7 AKD-EtherCAT drives).  This is used in applications involving more complex programming requirements and multi-axis applications.

Comments

Thanks, this is very helpful. What software do you use to program the AKD-T? I know PDMM uses Automation Suite.

eflores90 - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 08:28

The AKD-T is programmed in Workbench.

jcoleman02 - Wed, 02/25/2015 - 11:14
Log in or register to post comments

0 votes
+ vote
Vote up!

Hi,

The Kollmorgenn Servo System Catalog gives an overview of the drives, thought this would be a good starting place.

 

image

image

0 Comments
ANSWER THIS QUESTION
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.

If you do not have an account, click here to register.