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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

There is a lot of energy [pun intended, sorry] going into the design of next generation, high temperature, Down-Hole motor technology at Kollmorgen. The existing motor technology available in the marketplace has basically been the same since the inception of brushless motor for Down-Hole use by Kollmorgen back in 1986. Sure, the magnet technology has improved; giving us higher performance Samarium Cobalt magnets that hold up great in the high temperature extremes of the Down-Hole environment, but the basic insulation systems and motor materials haven't changed much.

The tragic earthquake and subsequent Tsunami that devastated the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan just over 2 years ago points to a great potential use of evolving robotics technology.  The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has created a competition among industry called the Robotics Challenge.  The challenge is to develop robotics technology that can eventually replace the need for humans to don those highly fashionable and comfortable HAZMAT suits as they go into very dangerous environments to keep a bad situation from growing worse.

Electric motors are used in machines and processes all around us.  You can find them in factories, automobiles, airplanes, robots and even your favorite DVD vending machine.  Regardless of the application, managing heat dissipation is a common theme. Electric motors are often selected based upon a particular work or load requirement.  One consideration of this selection process is managing heat dissipation.  Although electric motor design is constantly improving, all generate heat through losses and inefficiencies.  This needs to be evaluated when selecting the proper motor for your needs.

Quality, Delivery and Cost (QD&C). These are the factors most used to determine the value of a supplier. They are also the aspects of performance that we can most easily calculate, compare and analyze. A green supplier scorecard that shows high OTD (on-time-delivery) and low DPM (defects per million), along with competitive pricing is the dream of both Buyer and Supply Chain Manager alike.

In the high-stakes market of Military Defense products, however, this is not quite enough. With programs taking years to develop and often requiring decades of production and support there is another critical factor in evaluating a critical supplier. A company’s ability to minimize risk over the life of the program is of epic importance.

WELCOME to the Kollmorgen Blog. My name is Ray Butler, and I am a believer in “Motion Matters”. I am also someone who you would categorize as a user (reader, researcher, downloader, purchaser) of the web, but until now, not someone who contributes any content.

Kollmorgen, on the other hand, has been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years. We have a website with technical documentation and white papers. We also connect with you through YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and our blog. If Motion Matters to you, we are trying to reach you in many different ways and provide you information.

While all of this work by Fredrick Kollmorgen was going on another immigrant, named Hugo Unruh, was growing up in Germany. About the same age as Frederick’s son Otto, Hugo faced the harsh conditions in post WWI Germany with its rampant inflation and struggling economy. His family encouraged him to emigrate to the United States so he could realize his dreams.

Hugo was partially educated in Germany, but finished high school and two years of college while in the US. To help get through school, Hugo worked as a repairman at an X-Ray company.

Prior to leaving Europe, Fredrick became the proud father of a baby boy – Ernest Otto. This would be the first of three children, the other girls (Hildegard and Dorthea). From various records, I can only piece together a few bits of information regarding the early 1900’s. It appears Frederick’s wife (Agnes Hunt), an English woman, whom he married in Italy, traveled back and forth to the United States from England, bringing the children over at certain times. Otto was born in 1901 and came to the US in 1907, two years after Fredrick immigrated. Hildegard, was born in 1903 and followed to the US in 1910. Finally, Otto’s youngest sister, Dorthea, was born in 1914 in Italy –right in the midst of World War I.

Over the next few months, we will be publishing a blog series about how Kollmorgen evolved from its humble beginnings to today. Follow us on this journey and learn about the visionaries that built the foundation of our company.

Turn back time – to the 1900’s, the turn of the century, the industrial revolution in full force. A young man who was skilled in optics left his homeland of Germany to work under the auspices of optics pioneer, Karl Reichert in Vienna. Frederick Kollmorgen decided to bring his skills to America, passing through London with a brief stint with Ross, Ltd. Kollmorgen settled in New York, providing optic skills for Keuffel & Esser, who manufactured drafting and surveying instrumentation.

Noise, and I'm not talking about that terrible band you heard at the summer fest last year, but electromagnetic interference (EMI) noise. There are 8 key steps to consider when trying to eliminate EMI noise issues. If you follow these guidelines, you are much less likely to have problems with electrical noise in your application.

There really isn't anything to fear when utilizing high performance frameless servo motors in your machine design. Many engineers get concerned about "air gaps" and "concentricity" when discussing frameless servo motors - but there is little to be afraid of! In applications where an embedded motor design makes sense, the application shaft that the frameless motor will be mounted on will already be machined to tolerances well within the range required for robust servo driven performance. Concentricity, run out, and axial play all must be considered in the machine mechanism itself and will typically be well in range for the KBM motor family. With the use of high energy magnet materials, the need for an ultra-tight air gap is out the window!

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