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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

What is a laughable offense to the public is a representation of the hidden challenges behind packaging and automation. Sure, the package was mostly correct, it contained 8 buns, they were pre-sliced, and odds are pretty good that the two products weigh the same. The package is at least see-through, so as a consumer, you still know what you're buying. But what if it was a bottle of 50mg heart medication that actually contained tablets of 100mg medication?

All those permanent magnet DC motors, synchronous motors, servo motors, servo drives, stepper drives, oh yeah, and remember the great stepper motors they offered? The one stepper motor was a weird shape. It was octagonal where others are square or round. Hard to forget that one!

Sabotage!

21 Aug 2013
, by
“You clown’s don’t have a chance in hell! You can’t stump me!” I ranted to our team after successfully solving another challenge. The competition heated up. Just days before I had set up a linear slide system with a servo motor and drive, and challenged each of my teammates to ‘break’ the system and challenge me to fix it. The ‘winner’ who stumps me gets lunch, on me. Essentially they were contract saboteurs

There are challenges for a servo motor's protection against overheating by the manufacturer, machine designer/OEM, and user, because there is no thermal device that can protect a motor against a fast transient event.  For just as there is a time lag between the final steady-state temp rise of a coil of wire with a given current going through it, there is a time lag for the thermal device to achieve its trip resistance once that trip/application temperature has been presented to the thermal device.

There is a lot of energy [pun intended, sorry] going into the design of next generation, high temperature, Down-Hole motor technology at Kollmorgen. The existing motor technology available in the marketplace has basically been the same since the inception of brushless motor for Down-Hole use by Kollmorgen back in 1986. Sure, the magnet technology has improved; giving us higher performance Samarium Cobalt magnets that hold up great in the high temperature extremes of the Down-Hole environment, but the basic insulation systems and motor materials haven't changed much.

The tragic earthquake and subsequent Tsunami that devastated the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan just over 2 years ago points to a great potential use of evolving robotics technology.  The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has created a competition among industry called the Robotics Challenge.  The challenge is to develop robotics technology that can eventually replace the need for humans to don those highly fashionable and comfortable HAZMAT suits as they go into very dangerous environments to keep a bad situation from growing worse.

Electric motors are used in machines and processes all around us.  You can find them in factories, automobiles, airplanes, robots and even your favorite DVD vending machine.  Regardless of the application, managing heat dissipation is a common theme. Electric motors are often selected based upon a particular work or load requirement.  One consideration of this selection process is managing heat dissipation.  Although electric motor design is constantly improving, all generate heat through losses and inefficiencies.  This needs to be evaluated when selecting the proper motor for your needs.

Quality, Delivery and Cost (QD&C). These are the factors most used to determine the value of a supplier. They are also the aspects of performance that we can most easily calculate, compare and analyze. A green supplier scorecard that shows high OTD (on-time-delivery) and low DPM (defects per million), along with competitive pricing is the dream of both Buyer and Supply Chain Manager alike.

In the high-stakes market of Military Defense products, however, this is not quite enough. With programs taking years to develop and often requiring decades of production and support there is another critical factor in evaluating a critical supplier. A company’s ability to minimize risk over the life of the program is of epic importance.

WELCOME to the Kollmorgen Blog. My name is Ray Butler, and I am a believer in “Motion Matters”. I am also someone who you would categorize as a user (reader, researcher, downloader, purchaser) of the web, but until now, not someone who contributes any content.

Kollmorgen, on the other hand, has been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years. We have a website with technical documentation and white papers. We also connect with you through YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and our blog. If Motion Matters to you, we are trying to reach you in many different ways and provide you information.

While all of this work by Fredrick Kollmorgen was going on another immigrant, named Hugo Unruh, was growing up in Germany. About the same age as Frederick’s son Otto, Hugo faced the harsh conditions in post WWI Germany with its rampant inflation and struggling economy. His family encouraged him to emigrate to the United States so he could realize his dreams.

Hugo was partially educated in Germany, but finished high school and two years of college while in the US. To help get through school, Hugo worked as a repairman at an X-Ray company.

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