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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

I was going over some inventory the other day, and I ran across our old blog of 101 ways to brake your motor -episode 82.  The author of that piece, Mike, was just having fun with the title and the number 82. But it dawned on me, that we might be due for another installment.

Let me preface by saying that I am not an engineer. I do however read, on average, about 20 old and new industry articles a week, as well as the content that I share in training and on our social media pages.  I have discovered several ways to break motors throughout the years.  Some of them have some really great stories and I'll try to get their witnesses to write them down for future blog posts.  I have, however, discovered one of the most boring ways to break a motor.  And I guess I really discovered it as a child.

So everyone’s heard the phrase “think outside the box.”

And at Kollmorgen we do that. But the reality is we have to think about inside the box. It’s our job to protect inside the box. Our OEMs need us to be ever conscious of inside the box so that the box works and is dependable. But OEMs also look outside the box - does it fit, is it smaller, what’s the advantage?

What should you consider when factoring IP Rating into your specification and what other environmental factors should be considered when specifying motion products?

As a manufacturer of motion control products for a variety of markets, Kollmorgen Application and Sales engineers get involved in specifying products into all kinds of environments. Often these environments can be wet and thus an IP (International Protection) rating needs to be considered as a part of the specification of our product.

Normally my blogs are light hearted and meant to provide some thought provoking ideas in entertaining ways. Today's blog does not have that tone. On February 21st, a recall for a soft cheese was issued due to high amounts of Listeria monocytogenes. Virginia and Maryland have been investigating the products from the manufacturer, but the sad truth is there has been a death associated with this disease. Adding to the sadness is that the CDC is not reporting the age of the person who died, but nearly half of the reported sick were newborns.

The American Meat Institute generated a Fact Sheet related to Sanitary Equipment Design in 2008 which helps the OEM Machine builder to design sanitary solutions for the Food Processing and packaging market. Our blog post looks at the 10 sanitary design principles recommended by the AMI and how automation system design plays an important role.
Washdown applications can be quite the tough environment. In the first place, typically you’ll find washdown requirements on machines that process foods. You know how careful you are when cooking at home, making sure you wash your hands after touching raw meat. Keeping cooked meat away from the surfaces you had raw meat sitting, or washing the utensils you use to handle raw meat is common in the kitchen.
Consumers expect safe food.  The Feds expect a safe food supply chain-farm, processing, packaging, and distribution.  As we all work to consistently meet consumer food safety expectations, the need to prevent and control food adulteration and/or contamination is present in every step of the supply chain.  Our modern and globally expanding food and beverage processing and packaging industries have made and continue to make great strides in improving food safety by improving preventive, control, cleaning and sanitation methods.

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Aerospace & Defense
Applications
Automated Guided Vehicles
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Embedded Motion
Engineering
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Food Regulations
General
History
Installation Tips
Interconnectivity
Medical
Oil and Gas
Packaging
Robotics
Technology
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