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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

These 3 characteristics are crucial when sizing a motor for any application from military to industrial and beyond. In this day and age where everything seems to be getting smaller and more compact, we all want our toys to take up less space, but we don’t want to sacrifice any performance. Let’s use cars as an example. When someone is shopping for a sports car, they may be looking for things like high speed, quick acceleration, low center of gravity, small body, etc. These are all reasonable things to look for in a sports car. However, if someone was to say, “I need a two-door sports car with a top speed of 160mph, but I also need it to tow my 10,000 lb trailer”, we might have a problem. This is the same principle when we’re talking about motors. Just like cars, generally smaller motors have much higher speeds than larger motors. However, the large motors are the ones towing that 10,000 lb trailer, or in our case, exerting the most torque.
Frameless, or “servo motor kits”, open up numerous possibilities in designing motion elements for your machine related to performance.  A frameless motor consists of rotor and stator components which are built into a machine assembly to transmit torque to a load.  Many applications which take advantage of a frameless motor are direct driven, which eliminates bandwidth robbing compliance.  Effectively, this means you have eliminated torsional losses and any wind-up or spring losses.  

Search the web for frameless or kit motors and you will find many offerings to choose from.  When looking at the motor specifications, there are many important parameters to consider such as rated speed, rated current, peak current, etc.  What do all these things mean and why is it important to understand how the values are being presented?

Usually, in discussion about these terms, we tie in the word actuator – so more precisely, what is the difference between a linear actuator vs a rotary actuator?

Linear actuators, in essence, move something along a straight line, usually back and forth.  Rotary actuators, on the other hand will turn something a number of degrees in a circle – it might be a limited number or an infinite number.

So, linear actuator – back and forth, Rotary actuator - round and round

A collaborative robot (Cobot) is a robot intended to physically interact with humans in a shared workspace. This is in contrast with other robots, designed to operate autonomously. A "cobot" is a robot that works in tandem with a human worker. The assumption is that a cobot and a human can produce an end result better and faster than either could do working alone.
A collaborative robot (or Cobot) is a robot that is made to work with or interact with human co-workers. For most of us normal folks, the most well-known example is Tony Stark’s robotic arm. (For those reading who are wondering why I don’t refer to the arm as JARVIS, it’s because JARVIS is the AI and controls other things but not the robotic arm.) Tony has bit of an unhealthy relationship with the robotic arm, he insults it, puts it in a dunce cap, puts it in time out, or threatens to dismantle it. At which point the robotic arm usually hangs his robotic limb downward into sadness. But, the robotic arm is there to do work for Tony in his basement. He may have a large house, but he doesn’t want a 10-foot-tall robot behind a fence. He wants an assistant, a co-worker of sorts that can help build his Iron Man suits.

We’ve covered feedback devices before in our Blog in Motion posts, but today we want to touch base on current trends we are seeing related to feedback devices for servo applications. We asked Dan Wolke a few questions about where we see the market heading.

Last time in our Block and Tackle Series on “What is a Linear Actuator?” we identified the general types of mechanisms that are used to move loads in a straight line.  Today’s blog expands on that just a bit with a few more details on the different types used in the motion control world.
Mechatronics is taking a holistic look at a complete machine solution, taking account of all elements that make up that system that are part of the machine, including mechanisms, motors, drive electronics, controls, interfaces, and ergonomics.  A variety of disciplines are involved when considering a machine design utilizing a mechatronics approach. It is a melding of the physical expectations of a motion system whether mechanical, electronic, hydraulic, pneumatic or any hybrid of technologies used to accomplish a physical task. Often, these systems are trying to duplicate, simplify, or assist a human function, most often a repetitive motion that a machine can do better.

Question: What is a linear actuator?

Answer: Quite simply, a linear actuator is a device that moves a load in a straight line.  Linear actuators come in many styles and configurations – our blog post today covers those actuators associated with motion control.

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