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Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

A servo drive is an electronic device that is part of a closed loop system, producing current and voltage to rotate a servo motor. The closed loop system includes the servo drive, servo motor and feedback device, and is commanded from an analog or digital signal.

There are several considerations when selecting a servo motor for a specific application, such as the required speed, torque or force, motion profile, available physical envelope, and environmental factors. This means that the chosen motor solution must produce the load torque and speed requirements, fit in the available space, and perform as required under the subjected environmental conditions of the application.

Bode plots have existed since the 1930’s when Hendrik Bode devised a way to display gain and phase-shift plots in the frequency domain. Today, to produce a detailed frequency response plot that reveals the unique fingerprint of a servo mechanism in the frequency domain is as simple as pressing a computer key. This paper discusses five key items in a Bode plot and what they reveal about the machine.

A servo motor is an electromechanical device that produces torque and velocity based on the supplied current and voltage. A servo motor works as part of a closed loop system providing torque and velocity as commanded from a servo controller utilizing a feedback device to close the loop. The feedback device supplies information such as current, velocity, or position to the servo controller, which adjusts the motor action depending on the commanded parameters.

So, you’re beginning to size a new servo motor and drive for an application. How do you go about doing this? Sizing tools can be highly beneficial for achieving optimized products. However, one needs to pay attention to the warnings and information provided in sizing systems.

If you experience some unintended motion or unexplained drive faults in your motion system, there are several possible causes. For example, motion setup through the drive, a poorly designed program within the control, and motor or feedback commutation phasing 180 degrees out can all cause unintended motion. For this review, we’re going to look at issues created by the contribution of poorly chosen and installed motor cables.

Frameless, or “servo motor kits”, open up numerous possibilities in designing motion elements for your machine related to performance.  A frameless motor consists of rotor and stator components which are built into a machine assembly to transmit torque to a load.  Many applications which take advantage of a frameless motor are direct driven, which eliminates bandwidth robbing compliance.  Effectively, this means you have eliminated torsional losses and any wind-up or spring losses. 

These 3 characteristics are crucial when sizing a motor for any application from military to industrial and beyond. In this day and age where everything seems to be getting smaller and more compact, we all want our toys to take up less space, but we don’t want to sacrifice any performance. Let’s use cars as an example. When someone is shopping for a sports car, they may be looking for things like high speed, quick acceleration, low center of gravity, small body, etc. These are all reasonable things to look for in a sports car. However, if someone was to say, “I need a two-door sports car with a top speed of 160mph, but I also need it to tow my 10,000 lb trailer”, we might have a problem. This is the same principle when we’re talking about motors. Just like cars, generally smaller motors have much higher speeds than larger motors. However, the large motors are the ones towing that 10,000 lb trailer, or in our case, exerting the most torque.

Search the web for frameless or kit motors and you will find many offerings to choose from.  When looking at the motor specifications, there are many important parameters to consider such as rated speed, rated current, peak current, etc.  What do all these things mean and why is it important to understand how the values are being presented?

Over Christmas my family and I traveled to Cape Canaveral, Florida to visit the Kennedy Space Center. Since the trip (and even before) my house has been a buzz about rockets, astronauts, count downs, stages, boosters, and did I mention rockets? Naturally, I was one of the 3 million people to watch the launch of the Falcon Heavy live. And over the last few days, there have been several things that I have found myself reflecting on – and it isn’t nostalgia for the space race – its excitement.

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