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I was going over some inventory the other day, and I ran across our old blog of 101 ways to brake your motor -episode 82.  The author of that piece, Mike, was just having fun with the title and the number 82. But it dawned on me, that we might be due for another installment.

Let me preface by saying that I am not an engineer. I do however read, on average, about 20 old and new industry articles a week, as well as the content that I share in training and on our social media pages.  I have discovered several ways to break motors throughout the years.  Some of them have some really great stories and I'll try to get their witnesses to write them down for future blog posts.  I have, however, discovered one of the most boring ways to break a motor.  And I guess I really discovered it as a child.

Most of the AKD drive’s parameters have a 32bit data size, but some parameters have a 64bit data size.  Modbus communication on the AKD drive uses registers of a 16bit data size.  So for a 64bit parameter, it takes four registers to send the data over Modbus.  There are many devices, including PLC’s, HMI’s, and PC programs that do not handle a 64bit data size.  So what can be done to read and write 64bit values when working with Modbus and a device that only supports 32bit values?

There is a lot of discussion about the 1.8 degree step angle versus 0.9 degree step angle of industrial hybrid stepper motors.  Most stepper motors today have the standard step angle of 1.8 degrees, resulting in a 200 step per revolution.   However, in the early days of stepper motors, before microstepping, low end resonance played a significant role in many applications.

I often see some confusion in various customers’ minds regarding encoder performance with automation systems which have servo drives or variable frequency drives (VFD). Some customers feel that when they are providing best in class encoders, the system must be highly accurate.

Sounds logical? … Yes, but there are some other points to consider also.

Never sized a servo before? Well, we want to share with you some of the best practices we have found over the years. Over the next few months, we will continue this series with a variety of tidbits that will help you become more comfortable with the job of sizing a servo. In this post, we’ll start with the basics of good preparation.

So everyone’s heard the phrase “think outside the box.”

And at Kollmorgen we do that. But the reality is we have to think about inside the box. It’s our job to protect inside the box. Our OEMs need us to be ever conscious of inside the box so that the box works and is dependable. But OEMs also look outside the box - does it fit, is it smaller, what’s the advantage?

By definition, Eccentricity is a measure of how much a roll deviates from being perfectly circular. Ideally, eccentricity should be zero, but in reality, it is never zero. Practically not a single roll is a perfect circle because it is produced using a machine which itself is prone to some machining errors (since it is product of some other machine and so on).

What should you consider when factoring IP Rating into your specification and what other environmental factors should be considered when specifying motion products?

As a manufacturer of motion control products for a variety of markets, Kollmorgen Application and Sales engineers get involved in specifying products into all kinds of environments. Often these environments can be wet and thus an IP (International Protection) rating needs to be considered as a part of the specification of our product.

Setting up an Ethernet network can be frustrating if you don't understand the basics. A network is just the communication connection between two or more devices. These devices can be computers, PLC's, servo drives, HMI's, sensors, cameras…anything that supports Ethernet communication.
Unlike fieldbus communications only being supported by particular models of the AKD servo drive, Modbus TCP communication is supported by all of the AKD models. Whether you have a simple "analog" drive, an indexing drive, or an AKD with BASIC programming, you have the capability of using Modbus communication. It is a simple, easy to use, standard communication protocol that can be used in a PC, PLC, or HMI to talk to any AKD drive.

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