Back to top

Welcome to Kollmorgen's Blog in Motion.  We have been adding information and knowledge to the great web based world for many years - through white papers, technical documents, and even webinars.  Kollmorgen enjoys sharing our knowledge with you, as well as identifying other motion related tidbits through our Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and YouTube feeds.  Our newest source is Blog in Motion, covering a wide range of topics, as well as some interesting contributing authors with lots of Motion experience.  If Motion Matters to you, stop by, follow, like, and sign up so you can stay tuned for what Kollmorgen has in store for you!

Although my blog entries will generally call attention to new ideas we think will end up someday on the factory floor, drive-by-wire actually lags industry: this type of following, such as electronic gearing (a.k.a. cam profiling or camming), has been available in Industrial Automation for years.
Coating and lamination applications demand precise speed regulation in order to avoid velocity ripple that causes uneven coating and undesirable horizontal bars across the substrate. The key to achieving the most uniform coating is minimizing the variations in velocity as well as in metering of the coating material.
Moore's Law has long applied to advancements in technology-based industries. Servo- and Automation have benefited particularly from exponential advancements in memory as well as processing power, and most recently, astounding gains in sensor technology performance vs. price. Here is one definition of a servo system that I will use to limit the scope of what I share in this and future blog posts:
Washdown applications can be quite the tough environment. In the first place, typically you’ll find washdown requirements on machines that process foods. You know how careful you are when cooking at home, making sure you wash your hands after touching raw meat. Keeping cooked meat away from the surfaces you had raw meat sitting, or washing the utensils you use to handle raw meat is common in the kitchen.

There is a lot of energy [pun intended, sorry] going into the design of next generation, high temperature, Down-Hole motor technology at Kollmorgen. The existing motor technology available in the marketplace has basically been the same since the inception of brushless motor for Down-Hole use by Kollmorgen back in 1986. Sure, the magnet technology has improved; giving us higher performance Samarium Cobalt magnets that hold up great in the high temperature extremes of the Down-Hole environment, but the basic insulation systems and motor materials haven't changed much.

The tragic earthquake and subsequent Tsunami that devastated the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan just over 2 years ago points to a great potential use of evolving robotics technology.  The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has created a competition among industry called the Robotics Challenge.  The challenge is to develop robotics technology that can eventually replace the need for humans to don those highly fashionable and comfortable HAZMAT suits as they go into very dangerous environments to keep a bad situation from growing worse.

Electric motors are used in machines and processes all around us.  You can find them in factories, automobiles, airplanes, robots and even your favorite DVD vending machine.  Regardless of the application, managing heat dissipation is a common theme. Electric motors are often selected based upon a particular work or load requirement.  One consideration of this selection process is managing heat dissipation.  Although electric motor design is constantly improving, all generate heat through losses and inefficiencies.  This needs to be evaluated when selecting the proper motor for your needs.

Pages

Blog Taxonomy Helper

Aerospace & Defense
Applications
Automated Guided Vehicles
Business
Embedded Motion
Engineering
Fieldbus
Food Regulations
General
History
Installation Tips
Interconnectivity
Medical
Oil and Gas
Packaging
Robotics
Technology
University Partnerships
Subscribe to Blog in Motion