Back to top

On November 13, 2017 FDA approved a pill that can digitally track if a patient has taken their medication.  The pill is called “Abilify MyCite” and is used to make sure that patients with conditions such as schizophrenia have actually ingested their medication.  As news broke about this new tracking pill it rekindled both concern and excitement about technology in the field of medicine.

In our last blog related to decentralized drives, we indicated several key customer benefits tied to using this approach.  First, you can reduce your cable costs significantly in machine configurations with lots of axes spread apart throughout the machine.  Second, a reduction in cabinet space and cooling requirements since you’ve taken a number of heat producing elements (Servo drives) from the enclosure.  Thirdly, you increase flexibility in design. In this blog entry, we will explore what is meant by flexibility and how this offers several advantages.
Less Cabling, Smaller Cabinet, Less Heat…More Flexibility!  Less Cabling, Smaller controls cabinet, Less heat…wow, that’s all great stuff.  I can achieve this all with a decentralized solution?   Absolutely – and even more! Decentralized Control Architecture means shifting the motion control drives from the crowded cabinets, and moving them near to the motors – out on the machine where the action is.  Immediately you can see that this can reduce the size of the controls cabinet, moving all of those drives out onto the machine – but how do I see these other advantages?
In our last Block and Tackle posting, we touched on operating a motor in a hotter ambient temperature.  For this posting, we take a look at the Root Mean Square (RMS) Torque and why it is important. Typically an axes’ motion profile is broken up into multiple segments, each segment is found to require a specific torque for a specific amount of time to complete the desired motion.  For example this can include torque required to accelerate, traverse (against an external force and/or friction),  decelerate, and dwell.  Each of these segments affects the amount of heating the motor experiences and thus the equivalent steady state continuous requirement utilized to select the correct motor.

How do I calculate a motor’s continuous torque when it is operating in an environment above its rated temperature? Since the motor’s continuous torque (Tc) is rated in a 40°C ambient, how can I estimate the motor’s continuous torque during my worst-case ambient temperature of 55°C?  

Collaborative robots are designed to work safely with and next to their human counterparts.  A subset of collaborative robotics has innovative safety techniques that completely eliminate the need for a safety barrier between the human and the robot.  This enables a wide range of applications to deploy and benefit from this collaborative robot technology.

Question: I need to operate a servo motor in a vacuum, what are some considerations? 

Answer: In a word?  Outgassing.  You might think that proper motor sizing is a big issue, it always is, however if you can't conform to the other process requirements, there is no point to attempting to size the motor.  The biggest issue for any given motor selection to be run in a given vacuum for a specific process is the outgassing requirement, or rather, the avoidance of materials that would affect the process being performed and/or the life of the motor.

I was going over some inventory the other day, and I ran across our old blog of 101 ways to brake your motor -episode 82.  The author of that piece, Mike, was just having fun with the title and the number 82. But it dawned on me, that we might be due for another installment.

Let me preface by saying that I am not an engineer. I do however read, on average, about 20 old and new industry articles a week, as well as the content that I share in training and on our social media pages.  I have discovered several ways to break motors throughout the years.  Some of them have some really great stories and I'll try to get their witnesses to write them down for future blog posts.  I have, however, discovered one of the most boring ways to break a motor.  And I guess I really discovered it as a child.

Never sized a servo before? Well, we want to share with you some of the best practices we have found over the years. Over the next few months, we will continue this series with a variety of tidbits that will help you become more comfortable with the job of sizing a servo. In this post, we’ll start with the basics of good preparation.
By definition, Eccentricity is a measure of how much a roll deviates from being perfectly circular. Ideally, eccentricity should be zero, but in reality, it is never zero. Practically not a single roll is a perfect circle because it is produced using a machine which itself is prone to some machining errors (since it is product of some other machine and so on).

Pages

Blog Taxonomy Helper

Aerospace & Defense
Applications
Automated Guided Vehicles
Business
Embedded Motion
Engineering
Fieldbus
Food Regulations
General
History
Installation Tips
Interconnectivity
Medical
Oil and Gas
Packaging
Robotics
Technology
University Partnerships
Subscribe to Blog in Motion