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Question: What is a linear actuator?

Answer: Quite simply, a linear actuator is a device that moves a load in a straight line.  Linear actuators come in many styles and configurations – our blog post today covers those actuators associated with motion control.

Last time in our Block and Tackle Series on “What is a Linear Actuator?” we identified the general types of mechanisms that are used to move loads in a straight line.  Today’s blog expands on that just a bit with a few more details on the different types used in the motion control world.

Most of us have been there at one point or another…..wishing we had a backup copy of something. Whether it’s contacts on a cell phone or a program file in a motion controller, data is important and valuable.

Setting up an Ethernet network can be frustrating if you don't understand the basics. A network is just the communication connection between two or more devices. These devices can be computers, PLC's, servo drives, HMI's, sensors, cameras…anything that supports Ethernet communication.
Unlike fieldbus communications only being supported by particular models of the AKD servo drive, Modbus TCP communication is supported by all of the AKD models. Whether you have a simple "analog" drive, an indexing drive, or an AKD with BASIC programming, you have the capability of using Modbus communication. It is a simple, easy to use, standard communication protocol that can be used in a PC, PLC, or HMI to talk to any AKD drive.
Most of the AKD drive’s parameters have a 32bit data size, but some parameters have a 64bit data size.  Modbus communication on the AKD drive uses registers of a 16bit data size.  So for a 64bit parameter, it takes four registers to send the data over Modbus.  There are many devices, including PLC’s, HMI’s, and PC programs that do not handle a 64bit data size.  So what can be done to read and write 64bit values when working with Modbus and a device that only supports 32bit values?

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