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I often see some confusion in various customers’ minds regarding encoder performance with automation systems which have servo drives or variable frequency drives (VFD). Some customers feel that when they are providing best in class encoders, the system must be highly accurate.

Sounds logical? … Yes, but there are some other points to consider also.

Setting up an Ethernet network can be frustrating if you don't understand the basics. A network is just the communication connection between two or more devices. These devices can be computers, PLC's, servo drives, HMI's, sensors, cameras…anything that supports Ethernet communication.
If you have been following along on our Evolution of Kollmorgen posts, you realize Hugo Unruh was one of the first to successfully commercialize frameless motor technology. What most people don't realize is that Kollmorgen's motor-drive phase identification standards (A, B, C) were based on these frameless motors. Now the issue at hand is both sides of a frameless motor typically look the same, except for the side where the wire leads exit.

A specification will often state the required stroke for the application. What is frequently seen is that units are damaged by not following a simple requirement stated in the Installation Manual. Best practices dictate the utilization of End of Travel (EOT) sensors used with actuators and drives. This is done to prevent the actuators from striking the mechanical stops at each end, and typically a manual will clearly show where these sensors should be placed on the device. Actuators do have built in "bumpers" to help absorb energy when the mechanical stops are struck, but they are not designed to provide unlimited protection against repeated strikes.

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