• Over the years there have been discussions about the 1.8 degree step angle versus 0.9 degree step angle of industrial hybrid stepper motors.  Most stepper motors today have the standard step angle of 1.8 degrees, resulting in a 200 step per revolution.   However, in the early days of stepper motors, before microstepping, low end resonance played a significant role in many applications.  Most application engineers suggested either increasing the load, to lower the bandwidth frequency, or simply avoiding this low end resonance region altogether.

  • Brushless AC servo motors  and  stepper motors  have long life spans, which are largely due to the lack of wearing components.  Unlike brush type motors, other than the bearings, brushless AC servo motors and stepper motors have no wearing components.  Additionally you do not have conductive brush dust, which, as it collects on the commutator, may short the armature.  The radial and axial loading requirements of step and servo motors are based upon the shafts of the motor, which are usually far less than what the bearings are designed to handle, which provides for a healthy motor life span.  However, occasionally motors do need to be repaired.  Either a feedback device goes bad, or some kind of electrical mishap may cause the drive to provide too much current, which may damage the winding, or it could be as simple as the bearing grease drying up.

  • There has been a lot of discussion over the years as to who created the stepping motor, or at least the industrial 1.8° motor we know today. The two relevant companies involved with the design were Superior Electric, originally in Bristol Connecticut, and Sigma Instruments, originally in Braintree, Massachusetts. Although Superior Electric seems to have the leading edge as being the first, it appears that Sigma Instruments may have been the true innovator.

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